Lessons Learned from a Power Outage and Death as a Teacher

Granted, what happened last night was nothing compared to what people in Houston, Texas and all of Florida are dealing with right now from the hurricanes, but the many hours with no electricity and no cell service (for the most part…cell towers would work for 10 seconds and then be down for 20 minutes) was a wake up call.  Over a large area that included Nambe and Pojoaque (possibly a bigger area than that) there was a power outage just before 7:30 p.m. when it was starting to get dark.  Power wasn’t restored until just after 11:00 p.m. where I live.  It really made all of us realize just how dependent on modern conveniences we are.  I almost forgot how to light a candle.  Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but the fact I could only find ONE candle was annoying.  I could have sworn I had a bunch.  Note to self:  Get more candles.

Being yoga addicted as I am, I attempted to do my nightly hour long yoga practice in the dark…with that one pitiful candle, that didn’t emit much light, as my luminescence.  It was a learning experience.  Did you know that when you can’t see your body or see where you are in position to stationary objects, it’s REALLY disorienting?  It was an odd experience.  I had zero balance and kept falling over.  It was almost like being out of body or something where the me that I know as Atheria was without this clothing I know as my physical body.  I couldn’t tell where the physical me was.

After completing a very awkward yoga session having fallen 20 times, I threw on a robe and went outside to see what was going on.  And, WOW.  Stars…billions of stars.  It literally made me gasp.  With all ambient light gone, you could see everything.  I just stared at the sky with fellow neighbors in awe.  It was at that moment that I realized there really was a major lesson from last night’s situation.  Stop and look up.  Stop and look period.  Most people go through the day in such a rush and so distracted, we don’t SEE.  I said to myself, “Pay attention to this and everything from now on.”

Another lesson from last night had to do with this question:  Why is it we only meet neighbors during a crisis?

When I lived in Los Angeles during the big 1994 earthquake and the 1992 riots, I met neighbors for the first time I’d lived next to for YEARS.  Why do we all stay locked up in our apartments or houses and never come out to meet each other?  That’s sad…and very common.  It’s more common in major cities like Los Angeles, but it does happen in smaller New Mexico cities and towns too.  When I owned a house for years in Northwest Albuquerque, although I met a few neighbors, most I never got to know.  Most you never even saw.  They were silent and invisible.  In retrospect, it was odd.  Maybe the one good thing from hurricanes Harvey and Irma is that those impacted met their neighbors and they all helped each other.  Strangers helped other strangers expecting nothing in return.  It should be like that all the time.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BZDKUcQnjwX/

On a practical note, a really good tip I learned from some TV news report about Harvey and Irma is that you should always keep a laptop fully charged.  In an emergency, it can serve as a cell phone charger.  My scientist friend is currently in Florida working with FEMA to help people, and she emailed me saying that what they’ve found to be the most beneficial for cut off from power people are those crank powered radios that have built in USB ports.  Also, my friend who just got back from Switzerland said that this cell phone charger made by Anker is freaking awesome and you get about 8 full cell charges from one fully charged Anker.  I had never heard of them, and had to Google them.  This looks like the model she has:  https://www.anker.com/products/variant/Astro-E1-6700mAh-Portable-Charger/A1211013

On a funny note, I got all excited last night when I had enough pre-ground coffee sitting in my grinder’s collection cup to make coffee this morning.  I made a mental note to always grind some extra in case of emergencies.  But then reality hit and I remembered that I wouldn’t be able to make coffee anyway without electricity!  All I can say is THANK GOD THE POWER CAME BACK BEFORE MORNING.  Note to self:  Get a propane fueled little one burner stove and a camping coffee maker.

This whole outage last night has made me more curious to learn survival techniques.  That is not a bad thing for everyone to learn.  And, also, don’t take things for granted.  Be prepared for emergencies.  In my case, not being able to make coffee does qualify for an emergency.  LOL!  But, seriously, do stock up on some basic supplies.  I need to buy batteries too.  I have flashlights with no working batteries.  I did use my cell phone’s flashlight some, though, which was very helpful.  Don’t wait until a category 5 hurricane is headed directly at you to run to Walmart with 1,000,000 other people frantic to buy necessities.

This is kind of related, but not.  Bob just interviewed this nomad who lives on the road and who is extremely creative about how to get Internet service in remote areas without spending $1,000 a month.  I love people who are great at figuring out the cheapest and most workable ways to do things.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBoPjR3qSi0

And speaking of awesome Bob, he just lost a friend whose declining health caused him to end his own life.  Bob just posted 2 videos about life and death…and REALLY living…and not regretting things when it’s your turn to go that are spiritually based and important.  You may or may not agree with choosing when pass over to the Other Side, but he brings up very valid thoughts.  At the very least, he brings up things to think about so that when you are at the end of your life, you don’t have regrets.  (Note:  There is a HUGE difference between being suicidal because you’re depressed…DON’T DO IT…and compassionate euthanasia/assisted suicide when someone has zero quality of life and is horribly suffering.)

Embracing Death as an Ally:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mnH3k_uJ_Q&t=9s

Work Less – Dance More:  Embracing Death for your Best Life:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHNpnr5WJXo

In Light,

Atheria
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